Leslie Coffee

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womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.
Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.
During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.
With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.
Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”
Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

womenrockscience:

Meet Mary Sherman Morgan, rocket scientist, munitions and chemical engineer and one of the most instrumental players in the launch of America’s first satellite, Explorer I (shown above). According to her colleagues she “single-handedly saved America’s space programme”.

Mary started out life as a poor farm girl in North Dakota, her parents chose not to educate her by choice so that she could work on the farm. Eventually, she managed to graduate high school and then ran away from home to go to college and study chemical engineering.

During her studies, WWII broke out and there was a shortage of chemists in the country. Mary was offered a “Top Secret” job at a factory and had to accept without being told what the factory made or what her job would be. It turned out it was a munitions factory – Mary was put in charge of the manufacture of 3 different types of explosive. In her tenure the factory produced over 1 billion pounds of ordnance for WWII.

With the war behind her and after graduating her degree she started working for Rocketdyne under Dr Silverman. In the 1950’s the US was in a race to launch its first satellite into space. American rockets were just not successful, they either couldn’t accelerate to the necessary speed or would blow up on the launch pad. Out of dozens of other engineers Dr Silverman put Mary in charge of solving this problem. She invented Hydyne, a brand new and powerful liquid fuel. In 1958 Explorer I was successfully launched into space using Jupiter-C rockets powered by Hydyne fuel.

Shortly after this success, Mary left the world of work to become a stay at home mum. Much of her work was top secret and she was a very private person - she actively avoided the press. Barely anyone knew about what she did for the space programme.  It was only at her funeral did her colleagues begin to share her story. “Mary single-handedly saved America’s space programme” he said “and nobody knows but a handful of old men”

Sources: Sherman-Morgan, BBC

molecularlifesciences:

Top 5 misconceptions about evolution: A guide to demystify the foundation of modern biology.

Version 1.0

Here is an infographic to help inform citizens.  From my experience most people who misunderstand evolution are actually misinformed about what science is and how it operates.  That said, here are five of the biggest barriers faced when one explains evolution - I have faced these and they are documented in the literature.

I hope you can build on my work and improve the communication between the scientists and the public.

Want to do more?  If you want to donate to the cause of science education I suggest the National Center for Science Education http://ncse.com, your local university, or an equivalent organization.  Volunteering at schools and inviting scientists into classrooms are two ways to encourage an informed society.  Attend hearings if school boards start questioning evolution’s role in public curriculum.  Raise a storm if anyone tries to ban science.  Plus, it never hurts to reblog a well made evolution post.

Thank you followers for all your support!
Love, 
molecularlifesciences.tumblr.com

COLLABORATING ON A MANUSCRIPT

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: wrongcoaster

Education is what people do to you, learning is what you do to yourself.

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MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito at #TED2014 (via researchdevelopblog)

LOL well if that isn’t the MIT education right there.

(Source: explore-blog)

MY FIRST PI

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

Throwback Thursday! Brought to you by March 2013!image

WHEN I TRY A NEW TECHNIQUE ON MY OWN FOR THE FIRST TIME

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

credit: Bensun

ah-merome:

timelady-of-221b:

THERe ARE CHILDREN ON HERE

i gave up desserts for lent this literally killed me

(Source: maleficent-z)

TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF MY DATA

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

image

cubbiemcprude:

After checking out the website I feel it’s time to get healthy.

reopen NASA's WISH program for young women. | We the People: Your Voice in Our Government

women-in-science:

freddriccco:

Recently, girls across the United States applied for WISH, a program run by NASA which was offered to junior girls who hoped to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, a field in which women are a scathing minority.

However, today an email from NASA to the applicants canceled the program as a result of complaints from male high school students who demanded to participate as well. There is nothing wrong with men and women working together to create innovations and better the world, but with men holding 76% of the jobs in STEM and the stigma surrounding women in science, programs to specifically encourage female participation are essential.

Please join in combating this discouraging act against women in the STEM field by reminding NASA what WISH was really about.

I have several friends who have participated in this program, and it was an amazing experience for all of them. One is currently majoring in Engineering, and the other is majoring in Biology and Flute Performance. If I had known about this program when I was eligible, I would have loved to participate. It would have helped me immensely. 

You’ve probably seen me posting about how isolated I feel in my male-dominated physics and math classes. If you care about changing that to help the future women interested in STEM fields, please sign this petition. 

Sign it!