Leslie Coffee

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Sep 3

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

juliedillon:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

"We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it."

Jul 9

stormflies:

i’ll swim and sail on savage seas with ne’er a fear of drowning
and gladly ride the waves of life if you will marry me

Jul 9

8bitfuture:

Video: The Fujitsu lettuce factory.

After several years of shutting down production lines in chip fabrication facilities, the Japanese electronics giant is turning its sterile, dust free factory into a hydroponic lettuce farm.

edit: Have updated the video to a working link, it’s in Japanese now but you can still catch an English version here.

sellykitann:

cumberbabegonehiddlestoned:

styleofdress:

because i hate it when people post these without recipes, here are all of them. some of these aren’t EXACTLY the same, but they’re close enough to still be delicious.

triple layer brownie cake / cherry bliss brownie / chocolate truffle layer cake / snickers peanut butter brownie ice cream cake / surprise inside ice cream balls / chocolate filled cream puffs / brownie cookies / chocolate snickers cake / chocolate lasagna / double chocolate brownies

THERE ARE CHILDREN HERS

YOU ARE A BEAUTIFUL PERSON YOU.

(Source: shams94)

frlcker:

do u ever forget to sleep or eat or drink water or something and ur like “oh shit yeah I need that to live”

(Source: studip)

Uri Alon: How theater inspires mentoring in science

(Source: weheartit.com)

May 2

happyvibes-healthylives:

Vegetarian Indian Dishes

May 1
ucsdhealthsciences:

Prostate Cancer and Blood Lipids Share Genetic LinksBased on analyses of genome-wide association studies using novel analytical methods
Numerous studies have suggested a relationship between cardiovascular disease risk factors and prostate cancer. A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Norway, significantly refines the association, highlighting genetic risk factors associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides as key players and identifying 17 related gene loci that make risk contributions to levels of these blood lipids and to prostate cancer.
The findings, published in the April 30, 2014 online issue of the International Journal of Epidemiology, provide new insights into the pathobiology of prostate cancer and may point to novel therapies to lower blood lipid levels that might help prevent prostate cancer – the second most common cause of cancer death among American men.
The research team, headed by senior authors Anders M. Dale, PhD, professor in the departments of radiology, neurosciences and psychiatry at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and Ole Andreassen, professor of psychiatry at Oslo University, applied a genetic epidemiology method to assess statistics from multiple genome-wide association studies, looking for genetic overlap between the phenotypes for prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. In the case of the latter, they specifically investigated triglycerides, LDL and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist-hip ratio and type 2 diabetes.
The researchers also examined enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms – bits of DNA that vary among individuals – associated with prostate cancer and CVD risk.
LDL cholesterol and triglycerides displayed a strong association with prostate cancer.
“It’s fair to say that risk relationships of various sorts have been proposed between prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, although not comorbidity per se,” said co-author Ian G. Mills, PhD, of the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital in Norway. “There is a lack of consistency across cohorts, however, in size and direction of effects, depending on cardiovascular risk factor considered. The significant risk association with LDL cholesterol and triglycerides versus the other traits at a genetic level was novel and unexpected.”
Mills said the identification of 17 pleiotropic loci – specific sites in the genome which may affect the expression of a number of genes and influence a range of biological pathways, in this case affecting both prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease risk – was a key finding. He said the loci provide clues to the common regulatory elements that affect expression of disease-related genes. They may be incorporated into future disease risk test panels. And they might, ultimately, help shape “genetically stratified dietary or chemoprevention studies repurposing clinically approved drugs that regulate blood lipid levels” to alter the risk of developing prostate cancer, he said.
The current findings were made possible through use of a novel analytical approach developed by researchers at UC San Diego and University of Oslo, which previously had been shown to increase the statistical power for gene discovery in other diseases, including hypertension, neurological diseases, psychiatric disorders and immune-mediated diseases.
Pictured above: Micrograph of normal prostatic glands and those with prostate adenocarcinoma (upper right portion of image). Wiki-Commons.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Prostate Cancer and Blood Lipids Share Genetic Links
Based on analyses of genome-wide association studies using novel analytical methods

Numerous studies have suggested a relationship between cardiovascular disease risk factors and prostate cancer. A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Norway, significantly refines the association, highlighting genetic risk factors associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides as key players and identifying 17 related gene loci that make risk contributions to levels of these blood lipids and to prostate cancer.

The findings, published in the April 30, 2014 online issue of the International Journal of Epidemiology, provide new insights into the pathobiology of prostate cancer and may point to novel therapies to lower blood lipid levels that might help prevent prostate cancer – the second most common cause of cancer death among American men.

The research team, headed by senior authors Anders M. Dale, PhD, professor in the departments of radiology, neurosciences and psychiatry at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, and Ole Andreassen, professor of psychiatry at Oslo University, applied a genetic epidemiology method to assess statistics from multiple genome-wide association studies, looking for genetic overlap between the phenotypes for prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. In the case of the latter, they specifically investigated triglycerides, LDL and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist-hip ratio and type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also examined enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms – bits of DNA that vary among individuals – associated with prostate cancer and CVD risk.

LDL cholesterol and triglycerides displayed a strong association with prostate cancer.

“It’s fair to say that risk relationships of various sorts have been proposed between prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease, although not comorbidity per se,” said co-author Ian G. Mills, PhD, of the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital in Norway. “There is a lack of consistency across cohorts, however, in size and direction of effects, depending on cardiovascular risk factor considered. The significant risk association with LDL cholesterol and triglycerides versus the other traits at a genetic level was novel and unexpected.”

Mills said the identification of 17 pleiotropic loci – specific sites in the genome which may affect the expression of a number of genes and influence a range of biological pathways, in this case affecting both prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease risk – was a key finding. He said the loci provide clues to the common regulatory elements that affect expression of disease-related genes. They may be incorporated into future disease risk test panels. And they might, ultimately, help shape “genetically stratified dietary or chemoprevention studies repurposing clinically approved drugs that regulate blood lipid levels” to alter the risk of developing prostate cancer, he said.

The current findings were made possible through use of a novel analytical approach developed by researchers at UC San Diego and University of Oslo, which previously had been shown to increase the statistical power for gene discovery in other diseases, including hypertension, neurological diseases, psychiatric disorders and immune-mediated diseases.

Pictured above: Micrograph of normal prostatic glands and those with prostate adenocarcinoma (upper right portion of image). Wiki-Commons.

May 1

ricktimus:

Neil deGrasse Tyson is not impressed with all your sexism.

So there were actually 3 key women at this time in astrophysics, all of which found themselves at Harvard in the early-mid 1900s and 2 of which found themselves ‘hired’ (either as unpaid volunteers or for a fraction of the male wage) as Edward Pickering’s ‘Female Computers’ charged with tedious cataloging of astronomical photographic plates and the resulting calculations. 

They were:

Annie Jump Cannon - she designed the astronimical classification system we still use today

Henrietta Leavitt - she discovered the luminosity law that we still use to measure the size of the cosmos.

Cecilia Payne - was the first one to work out that the sun is made of primarily helium and hydrogen. She studied for a phD at Cambridge but wasn’t awarded one because she was a woman. She moved to Radcliff college (the Harvard subsection for the instruction of women) and got her phD there in 1925 and even though she spent her career there, she wasn’t given the title of Professor until 1954. 

See these links for reference: 

http://siarchives.si.edu/blog/pickering-women

http://www.thewire.com/culture/2014/04/this-episode-of-neil-degrasse-tysons-cosmos-was-for-the-ladies/361297/

Oh also - get this: “As Bill Bryson notes in his book, A Short History of Nearly Everything: “(Just to put these insights into perspective, it is perhaps worth noting that at the time Leavitt and Cannon were inferring fundamental properties of the cosmos from dim smudges on photographic plates, the Harvard astronomer William H. Pickering*, who could of course peer into a first-class telescope as often as he wanted, was developing his seminal theory that dark patches on the Moon were caused by swarms of seasonally migrating insects.)”“